Blog: “Assisted suicide accompaniment.”

I find it hard to understand what Monsignor Paglia, President Archbishop of the Pontifical Academy for Life, said last Tuesday, December 11, 2019

«The issue goes beyond the laws, and I do not want to give the rule to contradict that norm … I want to eliminate the ideology of these situations forever and for all. For me, that someone who commits suicide means a defeat of the whole society, but not of God. God never abandons anyone. Let’s avoid blocking ourselves in ideological debates: the most important thing is  ” accompaniment. »

In answering a question about whether a Catholic, even a Catholic priest, may be present at the death of someone from assisted suicide, Mons. Paglia told a small group of journalists that he would be willing to do so because “the Lord abandons nobody.” “I think that, from our perspective, nobody can be abandoned, even if we are against assisted suicide, because we don’t want to do the dirty work of death,” he said.

Read here http://www.infocatolica.com/?t=noticia&cod=36486

I am perplexed:

“I will protect [the sick] from harm and injustice. I will not give a deadly drug to anyone who requests it, nor will I suggest in this regard.” That required, he commanded, Hippocrates, more than two thousand five hundred years ago. It seems that Mons Paglia has forgotten or interpreted it ambiguously, and makes a suggestion, soft and subtle, to minimize assisted suicide. He would accompany, he says. It seems useful to eliminate the ideology, but we should know what it means. There is no accompaniment without truth, the truth of the person who cannot avoid the moral certainty of it. Assisted suicide is immoral. The accompaniment is not neutral, as if everything was worth the same. You can not consent to anything to approve something, such as “assisted suicide”

The unfortunate thing about this is that those subtle “directives” are penetrating more and more into current consciousness, that of a world more inclined to emotional reactions without seeing the implications that the words of a prelate have for the even more significant expansion of the culture of death.

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